1. Suspected Shiite rebels kill three soldiers
    Suspected Shi’ite rebels killed three soldiers and abducted several others after ambushing their vehicle in north Yemen on Friday, a local official said.”Houthi supporters burned the armoured personnel carrier and also kidnapped several soldiers after the attack, but it is still unclear how many,” the official from Saada province told Reuters in the capital Sanaa by telephone. An aide to rebel leader Abdul-Malik al-Houthi told Reuters five soldiers were killed in the ambush. Yemen, one of the poorest Arab countries, has been battling a wave of al Qaeda attacks, as well as a Shi’ite Muslim rebellion in its north and rising secessionist sentiment in the south.
  2. Israel moves ahead with anti-Iran plan
    Israel struggles to portray Iran as a threat to the world’s security saying the international community should make concerted efforts to counter Iran’s nuclear program. Israeli Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon said in an interview with Xinhua on Thursday that the world could not afford a nuclear Iran and therefore the international community had to avert the prospect. Ayalon said that Iran would turn into a “regional hegemony” if it went nuclear, adding that the international community had to deal with Iran’s nuclear work as “the most important thing. Also, a nuclear Iran will start such an aggressive nuclear arms race in the world, not just here in many countries, but also in Asia and other places. So it’s everybody’s interest to stop Iran,” he added.
  3. Baghdad revives book ban rules
    Reuters/Baghdad: Iraq’s ministry of culture has revived regulations forbidding the import of some books, prompting critics to accuse it of restoring Saddam-era censorship. The ministry has begun requiring publishers to submit lists of titles for approval, said Deputy Culture Minister Taher al-Humoud. He said the rules were based on law dating from the era of former dictator Saddam Hussain, ousted in 2003.